Colour Chart

Colour, Style and Shape Ideas...

 

Below are some of the basic colours which we use in our creations, together with styles and basic shapes. Should you not find what you are looking for, kindly contact us via the contact form below so that we can discuss your requirements.
As each of our creations is unique, you will find many other colours,
colour combinations,
styles and shapes which are also available on request.
Please note that hand-pulled colours often vary slightly from batch to batch
when we re-order the colour.
PLEASE NOTE THAT BEADS CAN BE MADE ON DIFFERENT SIZED MANDRELS TO GIVE SMALLER OR LARGER HOLES, SHOULD YOU WISH TO ADD THESE TO BEADING WIRE, LEATHER, SILICON CORD, OR WAXED LINEN CORD.
If you need inspiration on combining colours, please consult our colour wheels to guide you or contact us directly.

Colours

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Styles

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Shapes

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Design Codes

Create your own Design Code
Here's an example of telling us what you would like :
You saw a lovely bracelet in our River Pebble Range, but would like one in blue & white ~ Your description would be as follows :
 
  • Code : SKU 70 
  • Description : River Pebble Bracelet
  • Colours : 12 & 13
  • Style : A & B & I (Plain beads, some with white dots, some with fine lines)
  • Shape : SH-1 (Round)

The Colour Wheel

 
THIS IS A COLOUR WHEEL WHICH WAS SHARED BY SOMEONE ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB AROUND 8 YEARS AGO. UNFORTUNATELY I AM UNAWARE OF WHO THE AUTHOR IS. MY APOLOGIES FOR NOT BEING ABLE TO GIVE CREDIT TO THAT PERSON. I HOPE THIS INFORMATION WILL ASSIST YOU IN YOUR COLOUR CHOICES, I FOUND IT VERY INTERESTING AND VERY WELL PRESENTED.

Barbara Desvaux de Marigny, Studio 44 Mauritius.

Color theory encompasses a multitude of definitions, concepts and design applications. All the information would fill several encyclopedias. As an introduction, here are a few basic concepts.
The Color Wheel
 
A color circle, based on red, yellow and blue, is traditional in the field of art. Sir Isaac Newton developed the first circular diagram of colors in 1666. Since then scientists and artists have studied and designed numerous variations of this concept. Differences of opinion about the validity of one format over another continue to provoke debate. In reality, any color circle or color wheel which presents a logically arranged sequence of pure hues has merit.
PRIMARY COLORS  
Red, yellow and blue
 
In traditional color theory, these are the 3 pigment colors that can not be mixed or formed by any combination of other colors. All other colors are derived from these 3 hues
SECONDARY COLORS
Green, orange and purple

 
These are the colors formed by mixing the primary colors.
TERTIARY COLORS
Yellow-orange, red-orange, red-purple, blue-purple, blue-green and yellow-green.
These are the colors formed by mixing a primary and a secondary color. That's why the hue is a two word name, such as blue-green, red-violet, and yellow-orange.
COLOR HARMONY
Harmony can be defined as a pleasing arrangement of parts, whether it be music, poetry, color, or even an ice cream sundae.

In visual experiences, harmony is something that is pleasing to the eye. It engages the viewer and it creates an inner sense of order, a balance in the visual experience. When something is not harmonious, it's either boring or chaotic. At one extreme is a visual experience that is so bland that the viewer is not engaged. The human brain will reject under-stimulating information. At the other extreme is a visual experience that is so overdone, so chaotic that the viewer can't stand to look at it. The human brain rejects what it can not organize, what it can not understand. The visual task requires that we present a logical structure. Color harmony delivers visual interest and a sense of order.

In summary, extreme unity leads to under-stimulation, extreme complexity leads to over-stimulation. Harmony is a dynamic equilibrium.
Some Formulas for Color Harmony
There are many theories for harmony. The following illustrations and descriptions present some basic formulas .
 
A color scheme based on analogous colors
Analogous colors are any three colors which are side by side on a 12 part color wheel, such as yellow-green, yellow, and yellow-orange. Usually one of the three colors predominates.
A color scheme based on complementary colors
 
Complementary colors are any two colors which are directly opposite each other, such as red and green and red-purple and yellow-green. In the illustration above, there are several variations of yellow-green in the leaves and several variations of red-purple in the orchid. These opposing colors create maximum contrast and maximum stability.